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Sunday, August 31, 2014

Visitors requests....maybe you can help out




From now on I'll be using this post for your requests that I'll copy from the Chatbox. I'll do my best to keep it up te date.You may also leave requests, comments  and replies in the usual way and after moderation they will appear. As this posting will drop down the list with every new posting I will update it once a week to insure that it stays visible and near the top. Comments will be deleted regulary to keep them up to date.
Please do not request new or easy to find CD's as they will not be posted here. There are other excellent blogs that can help you out with your request.
That all been said we will have to start from scratch with the requests.

Requested:
02-06-2014 Marineband:  Big Joe Turner 'Boss Man Of The Blues' LP with Rod Piazza.
08-06-2014 Clare Quilty: Allen Bunn – Baby I'm Gonna Throw You Out & Billy Boy Arnold - Hello Stranger
12-06-2014 Gerard Herzhaft/Blue Eye: I'm looking for a .mp3 copy of only one song by Calvin Leavy:Give me your loving loving loving (originally on a Soul Beat 45 116).
Also, I have a copy that was sent to me of a Calvin Leavy number "One minute before midnight" that no discography includes. Is it another title for "It's a miracle" (I feel that but...)
13-06-2014 Owlface: Victoria Spivey and her Blues - Spivey Records LP-1002
18-06-2014: MarcD: Jody Williams - Time for a change / Lonely without you (Yulando 8665) Needed for research
07-07-2014: Steve626: Ronnie Hawkins - Rrrracket Time, with James Cotton
24-07-2104 Anonymous: Guitar Shorty "On The Rampage" Olive Branch Blues LP - this is Guitar Shorty/David Kearney
04-08-2104 HM: Earl Hooker Put Your Shoes On Willie. Checker 45 B side to Tanya
10-8-2014 Bob Mac: Alfred Bolden: His Last and Greatest (King KS-G3-1106)
13-08-2014 Anonymous: George & Ethel McCoy: Early In The Morning - Adelphi AD 1004
18-08-2014 Gerard Herzhaft:
Elmon Mickle & Ernie Pruitt Whatever You're Doing, Keep On Doing It/ Short 'n' Fat (E. M. and E. P. Records 133)Good Morning Little School girl(Wonder 15001) Any kind of .mp3 would fit!
20-08-2014 Rob F: Va - Those old happy days: 1960s blues from the Gulf (Flyright FLY 513)
23-08-2014 Aunt Fin: VA - Take A Little Walk With Me The Blues in Chicago   1948-1957
Boogie Disease
24-08-2014 Fabio: Big Joe Williams - Highway May on Southland
30-08-2014 Gerard Herzhaft: Big Joe Turner/ Still boss of the blues (Kent or United) HM is going to provide a rip.

Hokum Boys - You Can't Get Enough Of That Stuff

The word "hokum" is believed to have descended from the English term "hokey-pokey," denoting both ridicule and the ridiculous; for more than a century "hokey-pokey" has also been used, on both sides of the Atlantic, to describe low-grade ice cream sold on the streets. Hokum can mean flattery, insincerity, derision, deception, nonsense, cheapness, or any sort of stage gimmickry used to elicit a response from jaded audiences. Musically, hokum conveys and deserves most if not all of these meanings. Between the years 1929 and 1937 several different Chicago-based blues/jazz ensembles made records as the Hokum Boys or the Famous Hokum Boys. During the summer of 1929 pianist Alex Hill and guitarists Dan Roberts and Alex Robinson made records for the Paramount label under the name of the Hokum Boys. By early autumn the group consisted of pianist Jimmy Blythe, guitarist Bob Alexander, and a banjoist named Bob Robinson who also played clarinet. In November and December 1929 Ikey Robinson made a series of records for OKeh, first with Jimmy Blythe, then with Alex Hill. Throughout the second half of 1929 these men collaborated with pianist Leroy Carr and guitarist Scrapper Blackwell and made a number of recordings that were issued under the name of the Famous Hokum Boys. The Famous Hokum Boys name was adopted (or hijacked) by Big Bill Broonzy, first in 1930 and 1931, then again between 1935 and 1937 when he made records with various tough customers including Washboard Sam, Black Bob, Casey Bill Weldon, clarinetist Arnett Nelson, bass saxophonist Bill Settles, and a trumpeter named Mr. Sheiks. The only member of the original Hokum Boys to participate in Broonzy's Hokum sessions was Bob Robinson. Various labels have made a point of reissuing every recording known to have been made by these entertaining little bands.
(Allmusic - Artwulf Artwulf)
Thanks go to Jillem for the rip.
Post: http://www49.zippyshare.com/v/75118737/file.html

Willie Mabon - Shake That Thing

This album was recorded in Toulouse, France and Amstelveen, Holland in 1973 and shows Willie Mabon in top form on vocals, piano, and harmonica playing all originals. He's backed by The Aces (Louis Myers, lead guitar; Dave Myers, bass; Fred Below, drums) and Jimmy Rogers (rhythm guitar) and what a great band they make! Solid performances throughout, and the recording quality is superb.
Thanks go to Blue Eye for providing the rip of the LP. It has been re-released on CD with 7 extra tracks so that's worthwhile looking for. I was at the the Amstelveen concert in the Bajes(?) and can remeber that I enjoyed it very much and I think Willie also enjoyed playing.

Post: http://www49.zippyshare.com/v/1424268/file.html

Elmore James - History Of Vol. 1 & 2


Vol 1.: http://www49.zippyshare.com/v/98387938/file.html


Vol. 2: http://www49.zippyshare.com/v/40918694/file.html

Just filling a request but if you really need a track list before downloading I suggest visiting Discogs.

Jim Brewer - Tough Luck

Tough Luck is Delta blues at its best — its words and melodies sing of the human condition in its most expressive manner. Listeners who enjoy Son House or Mississippi John Hurt will welcome the music of Jim Brewer.
Brewer sang blues in the understated mellow manner that seeps inside of you even as you drink and chat; his deep soft voice and the light knowing touch of calloused fingers on the strings picked out many layered patterns of blue.

Post: http://www58.zippyshare.com/v/21078792/file.html

Jim Brewer - Same

Jim Brewer died twenty years, on June 3rd 1988, and unless you were a blues collector in the 1960's and 70's it's a safe bet that you may never have heard of this superb bluesman who was under recorded during his lifetime, and these days has just a handful of songs currently scattered on a few CD anthologies. Although he moved from Mississippi to Chicago in 1940, where he resided until his death, his guitar playing was still rooted in the Mississippi style he picked up as a youth. His repertoire as well was formed by the singers he heard, mostly on record or radio, in the 1940's and 50's; singers like Big Bill Broonzy, Tampa Red, Big Maceo and Peetie Wheatstraw who Brewer ran with in St. Louis for a spell. As he told Paul Oliver: "I went down to St. Louis, spent four or five years down there, woofin' and beefin' aroun' and blowin' my top as usually. An' I met a feller there down on Market and Main and places in East St. Louis, name of Peetie Wheatstraw. …I use to run aroun' with him quite a bit." Gospel music played a large part in Brewer's music and like many musicians of his generation he was torn for awhile between playing blues and playing gospel. Sometime in the late 1950's through the early 1960's he devoted himself almost entirely to gospel. It was in this context that Oliver first encountered him: "We first heard Blind James Brewer playing with a Gospel group which was holding service under the guidance of a fiercely exhorting 'jack-leg' preacher on the broken sidewalk of South Sangamon Street, Chicago, a short step from Brewer's home." Like many bluesman his allegiance to gospel wasn't steadfast as Oliver makes clear: "On another day we heard him with Blind Gray and recorded him playing I'm So Glad Good Whiskey's Back (Heritage HLP 1004)." Brewer was anything if not pragmatic: ""Well lots of people say, 'What profit you in the world if you gain the world and lose your soul?'-Well I realize that's true too. But you got to live down here just like you got to make preparations to go up there. …You got to live this life, and you got to obey God. And God give me this talent and he knew before I came into this world what I was goin' to make out of this talent." While playing on the streets of his hometown of Brookhaven, MS in the 1930’s he learned most of the religious songs that he continued to perform throughout his life. His father told him he could make more money playing blues and as he grew older he started performing at parties having learned his repertoire from records.

By the mid-1950’s, after roaming around for a bit, he was back in Chicago where he married his wife Fannie. Brewer’s new mother-in-law bought him an electric guitar and amplifier. Returning to Maxwell Street, where he began performing in the early 1940's,  he devoted himself exclusively to religious music. In 1962, however, he was offered an opportunity to play blues at a concert at Northwestern University and also began a regular gig at the No Exit Cafe which lasted for two decades. He went on to play major festivals and clubs in the United States, Canada and Europe. He was recorded by Swedish Radio in 1964, cut sides for the Heritage label, was recoded by Pete Welding who issued the sides on his Testament label was well as Milestone and Storyville, plus cut the full-length albums Jim Brewer (Philo, 1974) and Tough Luck (Earwig, 1983). Brewer was also captured on film performing with his wife on Maxwell Street in 1964 for the documentary And This Is Free.

Recorded less than a decade apart, Brewer's two full-length albums are marvelous examples of his artistry showcasing him playing solo acoustic on a program of mostly standards. Jim Brewer was recorded live at Kirkland College to an appreciative audience and Brewer seems at his best when working a crowd. Four cuts on Tough Luck were recorded live at the 9th annual Gambier Folk Festival in 1980 while the other numbers were cut in the studio in 1978 and 1982. I think the first album is the stronger of the two and really benefits from the fact that it captures a complete live performance complete with plenty of charming asides to the audience who seem captivated by Brewer's lively singing and guitar playing. Clas Ahlstrand summed up Brewer's guitar style succinctly in a 1967 Blues Unlimited article: "As a blues guitarist Jim Brewer must be considered one of the best in Chicago. His style is complex and filled with an easy, fluent rhythm. It is is definitely not 'Chicago styled, but softer and more 'Country.'" Indeed like his repertoire, which seems frozen in the 1940's and in the traditional songs he heard as a youngster, his guitar playing too seems firmly rooted in a Mississippi country style he learned as a youth. But as Ahlstrand points out, its appeal lies in Brewer's deep sense of rhythm which effortlessly rolls from his fingertips belying the complexity of his playing. This driving complexity is heard to fine effect in the good time numbers "She Wants To Boogie" and "Shak-a-You-Boogie" as well as a gorgeous version of the chestnut "St. Louis Blues" delivered with a seductive drive and sense of humor that invests this well worn tune with brand new sheen. The same can be said on a warmly sung version of "Corrina" and a powerful cover of "Crawlin' King Snake." Brewer plays only one gospel number on these albums, opening up his self titled album with a rousing, sanctified version of "I'll Fly Away" that lasts just over a minute before segueing into "Liberty Bill" which he announces by saying "Now I'm going to play some, some old, you know them way back down home blues." In addition to his guitar skills, Brewer possesses a  powerful yet easygoing voice, often drawing out his lines for dramatic effect.

Brewer's four live cuts from Tough Luck, are every bit as good as the previous album; Brewer is in commanding form on the stark, powerfully sung "Goin' Away Baby", a driving version of Tommy Johnson's timeless "Big Road" and employs a gentle voice and deft fingerpicking to "Goin' Down The Road Feelin' Bad." There's a reason certain songs have become standards and even though you may have heard "kansas City Blues" umpteen times, artists like Brewer are able to find the very essence of what makes this song so timeless, giving this classic a vivacious reading a feat he also performs on Arthur Crudup's "Mean Old 'Frisco." Brewer is a fine interpreter as he shows on terrific versions of Big Maceo's "Poor Kelley" and "Tough Luck Blues" and Walter Davis' "Come Back Baby", ably translated from piano to guitar. "Oak Top Boogie", a mostly instrumental with spoken asides, is a fine guitar boogie while "Hair Like A Horse's Mane" is a beautiful version of this standard and a song he clearly had an affection for, cutting it originally back in 1964.

Unfortunately Brewer's two LP's are long out of print and only a few of his songs appear on CD; a pair of songs on a couple of Earwig anthologies, his songs for Swedish Radio can be found on the CD I Blueskvarter Chicago 1964, Volume One and a few gospel numbers appear on And This Is Maxwell Street. Brewer remained an in demand musician until the end, and as long time supporter Andy Cohen wrote: "He died with gigs on his calendar."
Thanks to Sundayblues/org for the review.

Post: http://www58.zippyshare.com/v/83637229/file.html

Johnny Shines - Hey Ba-Ba-Re-Bop

Delta blues vocalist, guitarist, and composer Johnny Shines hadn't yet encountered the physical difficulties that made his final years so troubling when he recorded the 13 selections on this CD. He could still sing and moan with intensity and passion, hold a crowd hypnotized with his remembrances and asides, and play with a mix of fury and charm. While the menu includes oft-performed chestnuts "Sweet Home Chicago," "Terraplane Blues," and "Milk Cow Blues," there wasn't anything staid or predictable about the way Shines ripped through the lyrics and presented the music.

Post: http://www58.zippyshare.com/v/55194602/file.html

Tuesday, August 26, 2014

Various - Nothing But The Blues

One of the first, if not the first, blues LP's that I bought way back in the early 70's that introduced me to some of the best blues around. OK, there is no Muddy or Howlin Wolf but you get the great J.B. Lenoir, Doctor Ross, Juke Boy Bonner, Otis Rush and many more on the 2 LP's. Put together by Mike Leadbitter to go with the book with the same title. Essential reading at the time.
Thanks go to Rob for requesting it and giving me a chance to hear it again after so many years.

Post: http://www61.zippyshare.com/v/4790471/file.html

Sunday, August 24, 2014

Willie Mabon - Is Back Funky

The sly, insinuating vocals and chunky piano style of Willie Mabon won the heart of many an R&B fan during the early '50s. His salty Chess waxings "I Don't Know," "I'm Mad," and "Poison Ivy" established the pianist as a genuine Chicago blues force, but he faded as an R&B hitmaker at the dawn of rock & roll. Mabon was already well-grounded in blues tradition from his Memphis upbringing when he hit Chicago in 1942. Schooled in jazz as well as blues, Mabon found the latter his ticket to stardom. His first sides were a 1949 78 for Apollo as Big Willie and some 1950 outings for Aristocrat and Chess with guitarist Earl Dranes as the Blues Rockers.
But Mabon's asking price for a night's work rose dramatically when his 1952 debut release on powerful Windy City DJ Al Benson's Parrot logo, "I Don't Know," topped the R&B charts for eight weeks after being sold to Chess. From then on, Mabon was a Chess artist, returning to the top R&B slot the next year with the ominous "I'm Mad" and cracking the Top Ten anew with the Mel London-penned "Poison Ivy" in 1954. Throughout his Chess tenure, piano and sax were consistently to the fore rather than guitar and harp, emphasizing Mabon's cool R&B approach. His original version of Willie Dixon's hoodoo-driven "The Seventh Son" bombed in 1955, as did the remainder of his fine Chess catalog. Mabon never regained his momentum after leaving Chess. He stopped at Federal in 1957, Mad in 1960, Formal in 1962 (where he stirred up some local sales with his leering "Got to Have Some"), and USA in 1963-1964. Mabon sat out much of the late '60s but came back strong after moving to Paris in 1972, recording and touring Europe prolifically until his death. (Bill Dahl - Allmusic)

Later effort from Willie Mabon released in 1972 on the small Blues on Blues label. Not Willie's best lp around but enjoyable to me. Thanks also go to Blue Eye for the rip.

Post: http://www61.zippyshare.com/v/99290209/file.html

Frits's Tapes Number 65 & 66